<< Our Photo Pages >> Trethevy Quoit - Burial Chamber or Dolmen in England in Cornwall

Submitted by stone on Thursday, 09 September 2021  Page Views: 32334

Neolithic and Bronze AgeSite Name: Trethevy Quoit Alternative Name: The Giant's House
Country: England County: Cornwall Type: Burial Chamber or Dolmen
Nearest Town: Liskeard  Nearest Village: St Cleer
Map Ref: SX2593668813  Landranger Map Number: 201
Latitude: 50.493197N  Longitude: 4.45541W
Condition:
5Perfect
4Almost Perfect
3Reasonable but with some damage
2Ruined but still recognisable as an ancient site
1Pretty much destroyed, possibly visible as crop marks
0No data.
-1Completely destroyed
4 Ambience:
5Superb
4Good
3Ordinary
2Not Good
1Awful
0No data.
3 Access:
5Can be driven to, probably with disabled access
4Short walk on a footpath
3Requiring a bit more of a walk
2A long walk
1In the middle of nowhere, a nightmare to find
0No data.
4 Accuracy:
5co-ordinates taken by GPS or official recorded co-ordinates
4co-ordinates scaled from a detailed map
3co-ordinates scaled from a bad map
2co-ordinates of the nearest village
1co-ordinates of the nearest town
0no data
5

Internal Links:
External Links:

I have visited· I would like to visit

woodini254 DrewParsons SumDoood Monocular71 rrmoser would like to visit

LSEllis visited on 12th Feb 2024 - their rating: Access: 4

ajmp3003 visited on 1st Jan 2024 - their rating: Cond: 5 Amb: 3 Access: 4

Neil1911 visited on 24th Mar 2023 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 4 Access: 5 Recent rain made it a bit wet underfoot but with care I managed to keep my socks dry! The lawn mowers just finishing work helped a lot.

Hodur visited on 22nd Jul 2018 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 4 Access: 5

lucasn visited on 26th Oct 2017 - their rating: Cond: 5 Amb: 4 Access: 5

lichen visited on 2nd Sep 2015 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 4 Access: 5

NickyD visited on 21st Aug 2015 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 3 Access: 5

shawid visited on 19th Feb 2015 - their rating: Cond: 5 Amb: 3 Access: 5 Still astonished that the huge capstone hasn't slipped off!

ModernExplorers visited on 9th Mar 2013 - their rating: Cond: 3 Amb: 4 Access: 4 A huge sloping dolmen in a field next to a row of houses

jeffrep visited on 19th May 2011 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 3 Access: 4

graemefield visited on 8th Jun 1998 - their rating: Cond: 3 Amb: 4 Access: 5

Arjessa visited on 20th Nov 1992 - their rating: Cond: 5 Amb: 5 Access: 5

Ergler slaybrook Bladup myf AngieLake TheCaptain rldixon JimChampion Arjessa ocifant TimPrevett hamish sirius_b cazzyjane ScottHK ArchAstro mark_a have visited here

Average ratings for this site from all visit loggers: Condition: 4.18 Ambience: 3.73 Access: 4.67

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by DrNickLeB : Trethevy Quoit. Photo taken on June 7th 2015. (Vote or comment on this photo)
An ancient Neolithic burial chamber, standing nine feet high and consisting of five stones surmounted by a huge capstone. One of the uprights seems to have fallen inwards and the capstone has a terrific slope. Cornwall Heritage Trust acquired Trethevy Field in November 2016 to improve access to the site.

Access - Any reasonable time. There is a small car-parking area next to the quoit's field with information board. The site is managed by the Cornwall Heritage Trust.

Location - The quoit stands in a field next to a row of cottages, 1 mile north-east of St Cleer, near Darite. There are some signs directing you towards the quoit, the lanes are narrow and not suitable for larger vehicles.

See more on their website.

The Quoit is also scheduled as Historic England List ID 1017579 and recorded as Pastscape Monument No. 434959. The Journal of Antiquities also includes an entry for the Trethevy Quoit, Tremar, Cornwall, which includes directions for finding this site, together with a description, background information and further sources of information.

Trethevy Quoit put on Heritage at Risk Register 2017 due to past erosion by livestock and fencing damage. Now owned by Cornwall Heritage Trust and Historic England are actively monitoring the stability of the site, more details in the comments on our page.

Note: A talk from earlier this year by archaeologist Andy Jones with a summary of the 2019 excavations and ongoing research: Trethevy Quoit: In Light of Recent Work. See the comments on our page for more
You may be viewing yesterday's version of this page. To see the most up to date information please register for a free account.


Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by bec-zog : Trethevy "Quoit"; Neolithic Tomb, near St. Cleer SX 259,688. Original oval mound would have been 7m by 6m. ref G. E. Daniel Prehistoric Tombs of England & Wales (1950) 239 (Vote or comment on this photo)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by wayland : Trevethy Quoit Category * A * (6 comments - Vote or comment on this photo)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by Bladup : A shower of light though the hole in the capstone at Trethevy Quoit. (2 comments - Vote or comment on this photo)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by stone : Trethevy Quoit, Sunrise at Summer Solstice, 2010. This is a true photo but has been Photoshopped to replace the modern cottage on the right with more natural greenery! (1 comment - Vote or comment on this photo)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by steveco : Trethevy Quoit SX259688. (3 comments - Vote or comment on this photo)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by StoneLee : A 'Giant' of a house. (1 comment)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by mikeaitch : Visited Trethevy after a nap having watched the solstice sunrise at the Hurlers, shot taken 11.42am 21/06/10. (8 comments)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by steveco : Trethevy Quoit Portal, the hole through the capstone. (2 comments)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by ericgrindle : Trevethy Quoit It's a very impressive structure although the site is enclosed with houses nearby. Parking is great and it''s only a short walk. Eric. Image copyright: Eric Grindle (Eric Grindle), hosted on Flickr and displayed under the terms of their API. (1 comment)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by daveyoung : Attached is a photo of Trethevy Quoit from a couple of years ago. I have just noticed, that the stone on the left hand side, has the profile of a face, slightly similiar to the ones on Easter Island. Probably this has already been noticed by yourselves. It just goes to show what natural weathering will do.

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by jeffrep : The magnificent Trethevy Quoit near St. Cleer in Cornwall, England.

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by stone : The underside of the capstone lit by the rising sun is an astounding sight to reward early risers! (3 comments)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by Manja : Visited in September 2007. A very impressive Burial Chamber, especially with this mystic hole in the capstone. (2 comments)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by cazzyjane : October 2010.

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by Bunnyhugger : Trethevy Quoit

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by Bladup : Trethevy Quoit, It really doesn't look original from this way either (1 comment)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by Bladup : Trethevy Quoit, The back

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by Bladup : Trethevy Quoit, It really doesn't look original from this way, one stone is the wrong way round and the other upside down

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by cazzyjane : Trethevy Quoit. October 2010.

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by JimChampion : August 2007. The south side of Trethevy Quoit, showing the amazing slope of its capstone. The upright on the left has fallen inwards, presumably increasing the tilt of the capstone.

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by TysonM : One of the more interesting dolmens in Cornwall. You can photograph this Dolmen from any angle and get a good image. (4 comments)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by traveller : Trethevy quoit burial chamber.

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by TheCaptain : Thought it may interest some of you to see a picture of the fabulous cake made by a friend for a significant birthday party this weekend! (7 comments)

Trethevy Quoit
Trethevy Quoit submitted by Alta-Falisa : Back in May 2011...

These are just the first 25 photos of Trethevy Quoit. If you log in with a free user account you will be able to see our entire collection.

Do not use the above information on other web sites or publications without permission of the contributor.
Click here to see more info for this site

Nearby sites

Click here to view sites on an interactive OS map

Key: Red: member's photo, Blue: 3rd party photo, Yellow: other image, Green: no photo - please go there and take one, Grey: site destroyed

Download sites to:
KML (Google Earth)
GPX (GPS waypoints)
CSV (Garmin/Navman)
CSV (Excel)

To unlock full downloads you need to sign up as a Contributory Member. Otherwise downloads are limited to 50 sites.

Stone Pages (Still Images) by Arosio and Meozzi
Megalithic Mysteries by Andy Burnham

Myths and Megaliths by Jim Dyson
Caradon Archaeology Group by Mike Peacock


Turn off the page maps and other distractions

Nearby sites listing. In the following links * = Image available
 1.2km WSW 242° St Cleer's Well* Holy Well or Sacred Spring (SX249683)
 1.2km WSW 242° St Cleer Well Cross* Ancient Cross (SX249683)
 1.4km WSW 238° Church of St Clarus* Early Christian Sculptured Stone (SX247681)
 1.6km NNE 30° Caradon Hill stone row Stone Row / Alignment (SX26797016)
 1.8km NNW 345° The Long Stone (Minions)* Standing Stone (Menhir) (SX25547055)
 2.0km NNW 341° Minions Cairns Cairn (SX25357073)
 2.3km NNE 32° Caradon Hill cairns* Barrow Cemetery (SX272707)
 2.3km N 354° Minions Platform Round Barrow* Cairn (SX25787109)
 2.3km N 360° Minions Mound* Round Barrow(s) (SX26017112)
 2.3km W 269° King Doniert's Stone* Ancient Cross (SX23626885)
 2.3km NNW 341° Minions Kerbed Cairn Cairn (SX25247103)
 2.4km NNW 339° Minions Bronze Age round cairn. Cairn (SX25157103)
 2.4km NNW 338° Trewalla Farm Settlement* Ancient Village or Settlement (SX25117106)
 2.5km N 355° The Hurlers (S)* Stone Circle (SX25817133)
 2.5km N 353° The Hurlers Pipers* Standing Stones (SX25717135)
 2.6km NNW 340° Minions Round Cairns* Round Cairn (SX25157126)
 2.6km N 356° The Hurlers (C)* Stone Circle (SX25827139)
 2.6km N 356° The Hurlers* Stone Circle (SX25837140)
 2.6km N 356° The Hurlers causeway* Ancient Trackway (SX25837142)
 2.6km N 356° The Hurlers (N)* Stone Circle (SX25847145)
 2.8km N 357° The Hurlers North* Stone Circle (SX25877159)
 2.9km NW 321° Tregarrick Tor cairn* Chambered Cairn (SX24157115)
 2.9km NW 322° Tregarrick Tor hillfort* Hillfort (SX242712)
 3.1km N 355° The Hurlers Avenue* Multiple Stone Rows / Avenue (SX2576371864)
 3.1km NNW 327° Craddock Moor Cairn Cemetery* Barrow Cemetery (SX2435071429)
View more nearby sites and additional images

<< Höltinghausen Megalithgrab

Cathair Deargáin cashel >>

Please add your thoughts on this site

Cornwall in Prehistory

Cornwall in Prehistory

Web Links for Trethevy Quoit

Stone Pages (Still Images) by Arosio and Meozzi
Megalithic Mysteries by Andy Burnham

Archived Web links for Trethevy Quoit

Myths and Megaliths by Jim Dyson
Caradon Archaeology Group by Mike Peacock

Sponsors

Auto-Translation (Google)

Translate from English into:

"Trethevy Quoit" | Login/Create an Account | 46 News and Comments
  
Go back to top of page    Comments are owned by the poster. We aren't responsible for their content.
Trethevy Quoit: In Light of Recent Work - talk by Andy Jones by Andy B on Thursday, 09 September 2021
(User Info | Send a Message)
Summary of investigations undertaken at Trethevy Quoit, Cornwall in 2019 and their wider context. The talk reviews the findings from the archaeological investigation of the field in which the portal dolman is set and places them within current knowledge of Cornish chamber tombs and portal dolmens.

The largest below-ground feature was positioned close to the Quoit itself and, on investigation, this was found to be a significant platform of greenstone. The material had been quarried locally and brought to the site. It was clearly an integral part of the monument. The size has ben estimated as 25m x 10m x 0.5, a stone platform of around 180 tonnes of quarried stone



https://muse.ai/v/Lx6DCC4-Trethevy-Quoit-In-Light-of-Recent-Work
[ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit by Andy B on Thursday, 09 September 2021
(User Info | Send a Message)
More on Trethevy Quoit
https://www.cornwallheritagetrust.org/our_sites/trethevy-quoit/

https://www.cornwallheritagetrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Trethevy-Quoit.pdf

and something on the excavations
https://www.cornwallheritagetrust.org/exciting-discovery-at-trethevy-quoit-archaeological-dig/

[ Reply to This ]

Archaeological dig at Trethevy Quoit, July 9th - 12th 2019 by Andy B on Wednesday, 22 May 2019
(User Info | Send a Message)
Archaeological dig at Trethevy Quoit by The Cornwall Heritage Trust
Jul 9 at 9 AM – Jul 12 at 5 PM

An exciting opportunity to help with an archaeological dig in the field owned by CHT which surrounds Trethevy Quoit. Volunteers should register their interest through the website
http://www.cornwallheritagetrust.org/support/volunteer-get-involved/

https://www.facebook.com/events/449411705869515/
[ Reply to This ]

Trethevy Quoit by lucasn on Tuesday, 10 April 2018
(User Info | Send a Message)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeHcIGGZ3AI&t=68s
[ Reply to This ]

Trethevy Quoit on Heritage at Risk Register 2017 by Andy B on Tuesday, 31 October 2017
(User Info | Send a Message)
RoyG quoting from Historici England: "Trevethy Quoit is an outstanding example of a chambered tomb (also known as a portal dolmen) dating from the Early Neolithic period and is one of the best known archaeological monuments in Cornwall. It has been added to the Register as a result of increased erosion by livestock as well damage to the field and land caused by fencing. When the site came up for sale, Historic England helped to safeguard it by giving a £19,000 grant to the Cornish Heritage Trust to purchase the field. Historic England is working with the Trust and English Heritage to improve the site, protect the monument and ensure that it can still be enjoyed by local people and visitors".

Roy continues: The quoit was actually placed on the HAR register prior to the Trusts acquisition which was last November, so only breaking news because the list has just been published.

The hope is that it will be removed from the list in the near future as the Cornwall Heritage Trust have not been slow in determining the degree of risk. With regard to my concerns with the stability of the monument which were noted (I and others, pointed out the huge reduction in the banking to the base of the monument over the years by the plough and stock and measured movement of the stones) it was discussed with EH in the spring and they have a very comprehensive monitoring system in place using modern technology to monitor any movement in the upright and leaning stones. Only time will tell but at the moment there are no plans for any intervention at this time. Fingers crossed it stays that way!

A video of the Trethevy Quoit Damage from 2013
https://youtu.be/sX0SzvidhuM
[ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Tuesday, 07 March 2017
Cornovian Chieftain remembers when He sat within this Quoit, his left hand came in contact with the Funerary Urn containing the ashes of its occupant and some items which were sacred to it leader.
When I sat and meditated on its occupant/s, I was aware that when the Quoit was originally built, the hole in one of the Stones lined up with the Binary Star, Sirius, which is a part of a well-know Constellation. Some of my family are living in Kernow and thus are Of Cornish stock as Cheryl Straffon 'might' aver. Cornovian Chieftain.
[ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit by TheCaptain on Thursday, 02 March 2017
(User Info | Send a Message)
Cornwall Heritage Trust acquires Trethevy Field. Purchase now complete.
At the beginning of November the Trust were informed that the field in which Trethevy Quoit is located was for sale. While the quoit itself was gifted to the Government in the 1930s, the field was in separate ownership and a potential buyer was keen to use it for grazing horses. The Trust was most concerned about this as some years ago there had been many problems with the public accessing the quoit because of grazing horses.

See more on their website .
[ Reply to This ]

New book: Trethevy Quoit: Cornwall’s Megalithic Masterpiece by Roy Goutté by RoyG on Sunday, 31 March 2013
(User Info | Send a Message)
There is a new book out which considers what may have been Trethevy Quoit's original construction compared to what we see before us today. Here is a review:

This excellent and thoughtful book gives a somewhat different explanation of the construction and subsequent history of the prehistoric Trethevy Quoit burial chamber in Cornwall. The author, Roy Goutté, has spent many hours studying the chamber first hand and has come to his own fascinating conclusion as to how the cromlech arrived in its present form. The reader is introduced, step-by-step, to the author’s observations and theories through historical references, photographs, diagrams and several model reconstructions of this Cornish ‘Jewel in the Crown’ structure from the Neolithic (and how it may have originally looked). His findings are thorough and convincing with certain aspects truly ground-breaking; it would take an even more thorough investigation to successfully argue against the possibilities he advances.

Roy Goutté has gone very much against popular belief which considers that the fallen stone was the backstone to the burial chamber and has an alternative use/place for it. He believes that four of the current eight stones are out of position and supplies convincing evidence to support his observations.

There is also a dire warning at the end of the book regarding the present threat to the monument. Such threats to our scheduled monuments should not be ignored and the author’s analysis of how the chamber now stands shows not only its inherent vulnerability but also the ever-present threat it faces from the agricultural machinery and livestock encroaching upon it; this threat is most vividly shown in the accumulative erosion of the Quoit’s protecting and supporting bank.

A thoroughly enjoyable read and a theory to set the mind working. Trethevy Quoit: Cornwall’s Megalithic Masterpiece is a thoughtful, well-analysed and down-to-earth exploration into one of the most stunning structures from our prehistoric past.

Paperback, 50 pages with over 30 photographs and diagrams.

Available from http://www.trethevyquoit.co.uk/ for £8.70 (which includes postage and packing within the UK). Australia: £11.40 inc p&p. Europe: £10.43 inc p&p. USA: £11.36 inc p&p.

Review reproduced from the Heritage Trust (which seems to be a one-man operation wishing to remain anonymous rather than a genuine trust). Originally published 29th March 2013:-
http://theheritagetrust.wordpress.com/2013/03/29/trevethy-quoit-cornwalls-megalithic-masterpiece/
[ Reply to This ]
    Re: New Trethevy Quoit book by Runemage on Sunday, 31 March 2013
    (User Info | Send a Message)
    That sounds very interesting Roy, I'll add it to my wishlist :-) I've also posted your website link in our 'Books for Sale' forum.
    [ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit solar alignment by Anonymous on Wednesday, 13 April 2011
Quite apart from any astronomical use, Trethevy Quoit is a brilliant piece of engineering. Whoever built and and used this Solar Construct were some smart cookies. We take the view that this is no "Tomb". The "Anachronistic Archeological Paradigm", the idea that theses people were witless savages, has to be abandoned.
David Kane.
[ Reply to This ]
    Re: Trethevy Quoit solar alignment by Anonymous on Wednesday, 13 April 2011
    Consulting engineer was staggered by the way the quoit is built.
    I could post a detailed description of the construction theory if anyone is interested. We do not confine ourselves to astronomy.
    David Kane.
    [ Reply to This ]
      Re: Trethevy Quoit solar alignment by cerrig on Tuesday, 19 April 2011
      (User Info | Send a Message)
      I would very much like to see this theory David. Please do post it .
      [ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit solar alignment by davidmorgan on Sunday, 10 April 2011
(User Info | Send a Message)
Any time now is a good time to visit, since, at about 10:15 in the morning, the sun just about shines directly down the capstone (35° angle and facing 125°?).
[ Reply to This ]
    Re: Trethevy Quoit solar alignment by Anonymous on Tuesday, 12 April 2011
    We were on site 9-12 April. We checked many things. The angle of Stone 8 (capstone) is problematical. It depends on where it is viewed from. From the south the angle is 24 degrees from the horizontal. It is the view of the light on the underside of Stone 8 that has commanded our attention, but what you say about the upper surface is interesting. Quite apart from any astronomical consideration what has astonished us this trip is the remains of 'carvings' that we think(!) are discernible. I can't remember where in Lockyer I found his 'alignment', but he thought the quoit is aligned on a Feb sunrise - May sunset line and we think he might have been right, but I emphasise that searching for alignments here belongs mainly to the past; it is the solar usage that concerns us at the moment, not least the capstone aperture through which the sun can be directly observed. I was doing this today with the sun just past the meridian. Thrilling.
    [ Reply to This ]
    Re: Trethevy Quoit solar alignment by stone on Wednesday, 20 April 2011
    (User Info | Send a Message)
    I would heartily recommend that the best time to visit this amazing structure is at sunrise on a clear day. To see the first rays of the sun begin to light up the underside of the capstone is to almost hear it sing with glory as it glows with a bright golden aura!
    [ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit Thread by Andy B on Saturday, 09 April 2011
(User Info | Send a Message)
Re: Trethevy Quoit by tiompan on Friday, 08 April 2011

I believe there are a few assumptions you have made Royston , the cairn was not covered , that the monument is a "device " and that any findings you may have indicate intentionality on behalf of the builders .That does not mean the results are not interesting .
The azimuths of the each side of the capstone and the angle of elevation would be great if you could furnish me with these . Or even the general orienation of the capstone .Thanks in advance .
There seemed to be some disagreeement about whether plans existed ,one certainly does possibly by Borlase but I'm not sure .

George

Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Saturday, 09 April 2011

Well, George
The structures is not symmetrical, so any reliable fiducial is difficult to find. However we have to start somewhere. In PLAN view the capstone is 'oriented' 130 degrees of north.

Re: Trethevy Quoit by tiompan on Saturday, 09 April 2011

Thanks , I'm assuming east of north as that is closesst o the plan I had with a difference of 16 degrees (par for the course ) and that's what it looks like on GE .Odd that Lockyer didn't mention it in SAOBMAC and yet got tortuously stellar among the Hurlers .

George
[ Reply to This ]

Trethevy Quoit Thread by Andy B on Saturday, 09 April 2011
(User Info | Send a Message)
I've rescued the entire thread from the old server, admins feel free to tidy up or repost in sections:

by Anonymous on Wednesday, 06 April 2011
Trethevy Quoit

I think one very important point to make here is that we start our observations and investigation with Zero assumptions. If we were to believe that we know anything for certain about this amazing structure then we potentially blind ourselves to other truths (even tentative conclusions can quickly solidify into dogma and become self-imposed barriers to further understanding). Having said that, perhaps there is just one assumption we should allow... that the builders, or architects, of this device were very aware of exactly what they were doing and why! To assume otherwise would be to strip away any real reason for further investigation, and whilst countless others may have subjected it to their scrutiny, I doubt whether anyone has looked close enough, hard enough and long enough to enable the bigger picture to emerge.
We also bring quite a diverse set of skills and knowledge to the investigation, as well as our open minds, and it already appears that this approach is yielding results (or at least observations and theories) hitherto unrecognised!

Royston E Naylor (colleague of David Kane)

by Anonymous on Wednesday, 06 April 2011

Ground plans are pretty useless. The structure is studied in three dimensions; something the archeologists have been slow to learn. You will have to be more specific about the capstone. What exactly do you want to know?

by TheCaptain on Friday, 08 April 2011

Without knowing exactly what you are measuring, it would seem to suggest that you are making the enormous assumption that the stones have not moved at all in the thousands of years they have stood. Something which I would think is extremely unlikely.

Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Friday, 08 April 2011

Come and look.

by Anonymous on Wednesday, 06 April 2011
At present Trethevy Quoit is the subject of an astroarchaeological survey being carried out by Horsedrawn Pictures. A ten year study has intensified over the last two years and the company has moved itself to Cornwall to establish a more permanent presence on site to study the usages of this 6000 yea old Solar Construct.
Preliminary findings indicate that the structure is a very accurate solar time keeper, in respect of the way light and shade play upon its inside and outside. Equinoctical and solstical alignments have been found of great accuracy. some enigmatic 'carvings' have also been found which are at present the subject of close study. Many other things have been found; not least a capability to directly observe the sun through apertures in the structure.
The study of the Optical Dynamics of this Solar Construct is ongoing. For further details:- [email protected]

Re: Trethevy Quoit by tiompan on Wednesday, 06 April 2011

It is usually assumed that portal dolmens had a covering cairn ,there is a survival rate of 50 % , and Trethevy does has evidence for one in the immediate surroundings . Wouldn't that have had an impact on any solar "observations " ?

George

Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Wednesday, 06 April 2011

That Trethevy quoit was once covered by a mound is indeed an assumption. The presenr inquiry, of necessity due to its astronomical nature, also proceeds on an assumption; that the structure, when in use , was not covered, and further, that it has never been covered. In any case, it must have been free standing before it was covered if it ever was. The discoveries we have made so far are so astounding in terms of solar accuracy that we are in no doubt that its usage as a free standing openwork Solar Structure is proven, and we proceed on that basis.

Re: Trethevy Quoit by tiompan on Wednesd

Read the rest of this post...
[ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Thursday, 07 April 2011
I think one very important point to make here is that we start our observations and investigation with Zero assumptions. If we were to believe that we know anything for certain about this amazing structure then we potentially blind ourselves to other truths (even tentative conclusions can quickly solidify into dogma and become self-imposed barriers to further understanding). Having said that, perhaps there is just one assumption we should allow... that the builders, or architects, of this device were very aware of exactly what they were doing and why! To assume otherwise would be to strip away any real reason for further investigation, and whilst countless others may have subjected it to their scrutiny, I doubt whether anyone has looked close enough, hard enough and long enough to enable the bigger picture to emerge.
We also bring quite a diverse set of skills and knowledge to the investigation, as well as our open minds, and it already appears that this approach is yielding results (or at least observations and theories) hitherto unrecognised!

Royston E Naylor (colleague of David Kane)
[ Reply to This ]
    Re: Trethevy Quoit by Andy B on Saturday, 09 April 2011
    (User Info | Send a Message)
    tiompan wrote on Thursday, 07 April 2011

    Royston ,I would suggest that to describe the monument as a device , believe that it had no surrounding cairn and consider the results of your observations indicate intentionality on behalf of the builders are all assumptions , but that doesn't mean it is not interesting or even wrong .

    George
    [ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Wednesday, 06 April 2011
At present Trethevy Quoit is the subject of an astroarchaeological survey being carried out by Horsedrawn Pictures. A ten year study has intensified over the last two years and the company has moved itself to Cornwall to establish a more permanent presence on site to study the usages of this 6000 yea old Solar Construct.
Preliminary findings indicate that the structure is a very accurate solar time keeper, in respect of the way light and shade play upon its inside and outside. Equinoctical and solstical alignments have been found of great accuracy. some enigmatic 'carvings' have also been found which are at present the subject of close study. Many other things have been found; not least a capability to directly observe the sun through apertures in the structure.
The study of the Optical Dynamics of this Solar Construct is ongoing. For further details:- [email protected]
[ Reply to This ]
    Re: Trethevy Quoit by tiompan on Wednesday, 06 April 2011
    (User Info | Send a Message)


    It is usually assumed that portal dolmens had a covering cairn ,there is a survival rate of 50 % , and Trethevy does has evidence for one in the immediate surroundings . Wouldn't that have had an impact on any solar "observations " ?

    George
    [ Reply to This ]
      Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Wednesday, 06 April 2011
      That Trethevy quoit was once covered by a mound is indeed an assumption. The presenr inquiry, of necessity due to its astronomical nature, also proceeds on an assumption; that the structure, when in use , was not covered, and further, that it has never been covered. In any case, it must have been free standing before it was covered if it ever was. The discoveries we have made so far are so astounding in terms of solar accuracy that we are in no doubt that its usage as a free standing openwork Solar Structure is proven, and we proceed on that basis.
      ,
      [ Reply to This ]
      Re: Trethevy Quoit by tiompan on Wednesday, 06 April 2011
      (User Info | Send a Message)

      The assumption that Trethevy had a cairn/mound is one based on archaeological evidence from other portal tombs and what is to be seen at the site today . Prior to the placement of the capstone the portal ,back and doorstones would have been freestanding but the cairn would likely have supplied support for the orthostats and provided a ramp for the erection of the capstone . Putative astronomical alignments are not a basis for deciding on the possible architecture of a monument or has been suggested in other cases , dating .

      George
      [ Reply to This ]
        Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Thursday, 07 April 2011
        Hello George,
        We do not proceed on what is likely or 'would have been', we proceed on the evidence that is there. It would be very good to date the structure from its astronomy but at this early stage it has not been attempted. No archeology of any kind has been done at Trethevy, however so any date however putative, would at least be a date where at the moment there is none. We came in search of 'alignments' here ten years ago and found none, except perhaps the Feb/May alignment identified by Norman Lockyer in 1905, which seems to hold true. It is, however the pattern of light and shadow that the monument plays upon itself, both inside and out, that commands our attention. That's roughly it, although there is a wealth of evidence for other usages, not least the direct observation of the Solar disc.
        We are preparing to shoot our documentary and will be on site most of the summer.
        Dave Kane
        [ Reply to This ]
        Re: Trethevy Quoit by tiompan on Thursday, 07 April 2011
        (User Info | Send a Message)
        I agree David , we can only work on what is there but we shouldn’t ignore taphonomy , degradation , secondary use etc .In the case of a recumbent stone circle with only one flanker it is reasonable to work from the supposition there may have originally been two . Also it hasn’t stopped astroarchaeologists suggesting orientations at sites that no longer have anything visible for sightlines e.g. Woodhenge .
        Dating any monument from it’s putative astronomical alignments should not be a consideration particularly when we have no idea of the level of accuracy or even whether the monument was intended for such a use , not that it would make much difference in this case if the suggested orientations are solar .
        I aware of Lockyer’s mentions of the Hurlers etc in SOABSMAC but not Trevethy , could you point me to the ref please ?
        Have you looked for the same patterns at other local quoits ?

        George
        [ Reply to This ]
          Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Thursday, 07 April 2011
          Lockyer gives little information, especially how and where his results were obtained. He says he sent Captain Henderson here in 1905, in the wind and rain. There is no evidence that he ever visited Trethevy, and indeed elsewhere he apologises for leaving surveying work to others. The alignment he mentions seems to mean the way the quoit is 'pointing', that is towards the SW, but there is little symmetry in this structure and he is vague as to method. We suspect Zennor Quoit may have had a similar solar usage for it bears a strong resemblance to Trethevy, but we have not surveyed it. A keen student is going there with bicycle, camera etc. in June to start elementary fieldwork preparatory to a general study. Lockyer's papers are in the care of Exeter University.
          [ Reply to This ]
          Re: Trethevy Quoit by tiompan on Thursday, 07 April 2011
          (User Info | Send a Message)

          Thanks . Do you have the an azimuth for the capstone ? I never trust plans , the only one I have suggests it is approx 294 degrees .

          George
          [ Reply to This ]
            Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Saturday, 09 April 2011
            my posts keep disappearing. Email me.
            [ Reply to This ]
              Re: Trethevy Quoit by Runemage on Saturday, 09 April 2011
              (User Info | Send a Message)
              It's nothing sinister :-)
              Andy's changed servers, see his post on the News front page.
              http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=2146413977
              Some comments have been lost during the changeover period and people are being asked to repost.
              We're all interested in what you've found at Trevethy, has the hole in the capstone or the 'catflap' been of any significance?
              [ Reply to This ]
                Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Wednesday, 13 April 2011
                The aperture in Stone 8 (capstone)can be used for DIRECT observation of the sun. The solar corona can be seen. This is achieved by observing at an angle. DO NOT try this at home. Never look directly at the sun. The ancient technique on show at Trethevy has to be learnt; only for the initiated!
                I take it by the 'catflap' you mean the entrance hole in Stone 2.
                The mathematics of this finely made feature are under study. The angle of the cutaway seems to have a relationship with the shadows cast upon it. The study continues.
                David Kane.
                [ Reply to This ]
                  Re: Trethevy Quoit by Runemage on Wednesday, 13 April 2011
                  (User Info | Send a Message)
                  Thank-you David, that's fascinating. I'd often wondered if the hole was for observation, possibly for the moon or certain stars as we (and no doubt the ancients) are all too aware that the sun can't be directly observed. That is a great discovery!
                  Interesting also that you mention shadows, that's an area very much under-observed I think, most people look at the stones and structures themselves, not at the shapes and directions they cast (apart from in a Meaden/fertility aspect)
                  I'll continue to read your findings with interest, you're doing something I'd love to be able to do myself.
                  [ Reply to This ]
                    Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Wednesday, 13 April 2011
                    Looking straight up through the 'caperture' reveals a small area of sky in which the sun and moon never appear; the angle is too great. However, looking through the aperture at an angle, that is, from the mound, brings both sun and moon into view. The rectangular patch of light cast by the aperture falls neatly across the eyes, and the sun can be GAZED UPON. This reveals its true nature; multicoloured, heaving boiling, dazzling but not damaging, and the Solar Corona can be discerned. I'm not sure whether sunspots can be seen or whether these are floaters in my eyes...but this is taking things a little far. Do not try this at home please, the optical dynamics of the process have to learnt before they can be attempted, otherwise eye damage might occur. I have been doing this for 20 years without damage to my eyes, but I know what I'm doing. My eyes are checked regularly and the opticians are astonished. Preliminary findings suggest that the caperture has, in 3 dimensions, the properties of a superellipse, or 'squircle', and this gives the physics of it optical properties that are also the subject of investigation.
                    After 12 years I know this structure pretty well but its full of surprises. The above only scratches the surface George, I'm glad to have engaged your interest.
                    We continue.
                    David Kane.
                    [ Reply to This ]
                      Re: Trethevy Quoit by Runemage on Wednesday, 13 April 2011
                      (User Info | Send a Message)
                      That's amazing!
                      Please don't assume that there's little interest in what you're doing, so many people read this site but the percentage who actually comment is a tiny fraction. Right now there are over 280 people using the Portal so your work is being seen by a much wider audience than you may think :-)


                      [ Reply to This ]
            Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Saturday, 09 April 2011
            Ground plans are inadequate. The structure is studied in three dimensions. However, plans are useful. None exist of Trethevy Quoit so we have made our own. We have also taken the liberty of numbering the stones in a logical manner which leaves room for adjustment. You will have to be more specific, please regarding the capstone. What exactly do you want to know?
            [ Reply to This ]
              Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Saturday, 09 April 2011
              A few plans exist, but worthy only of antiquarian value or vague and always inaccurate. Ten years intimacy with this structure gives me confidence in stating this.
              [ Reply to This ]
            Re: Trethevy Quoit by Andy B on Saturday, 09 April 2011
            (User Info | Send a Message)
            tiompan wrote on Thursday, 07 April 2011

            Not quite sure who the various anons are ,but they seem to disagree on the existence of plans .As I mentioned earlier there is at least one but northings on plans are often wrong and consequently it's a waste of time attempting to calculate azimuths from them . If you have the azimuths for either side of the capstone or even it's general orientation that would be much appreciated and as a treat the angle of elevation of the capstone would be great . Thanks in advance .

            George
            [ Reply to This ]
            Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Wednesday, 13 April 2011
            I've had to make my own plans George, and I don't trust them either!
            [ Reply to This ]
            Re: Trethevy Quoit by tiompan on Wednesday, 13 April 2011
            (User Info | Send a Message)


            Perhaps I should clarify that my main concern is with northings . Most recent professional archaeological plans are often excellent and are more likely to have accurate northings than earlier examples . It also shouldn't go without mention that early plans like Wood's (1740 ) of Stonehenge is as good as it gets .
            George
            [ Reply to This ]
    Re: Trethevy Quoit by Anonymous on Wednesday, 06 April 2011
    Are we not 5 days too late for this?
    [ Reply to This ]

Street View by amunptah on Monday, 15 March 2010
(User Info | Send a Message)
Street View
[ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit by gormer on Saturday, 01 November 2003
(User Info | Send a Message)
We spent nearly two hours driving around narrow roads that would have been mapped as bicycle paths in the U.S. to find this, but it was well worth the trip. Trethevy Quoit is tucked quaintly away in someone's back field--no admission fee, no hours, and no other visitors while I was there. I had here the experience I had been hoping for at the regrettably commercial venue of Stonehenge--something about this giant, tilted capstone weathering thousands and thousands of years while time whirls on around it is at once intimate, humbling and inspiring, and being able to touch the quoit and soak up the atmosphere around it without being hindered by fellow tourists was an unexpected delight at this "small" monument. Stonehenge has its place, but I'm so glad I went out of my way to truly find prehistoric Britian at less visited sites like this.
[ Reply to This ]

Re: Trethevy Quoit by Bunnyhugger on Sunday, 12 October 2003
(User Info | Send a Message)
I visited at sunset. You go through a nondescript little gate beside someone's house, into a field, and there it is! It seems so strange that this amazing Neolithic structure is in such an everyday position. It doesn't detract from the jaw-dropping size of the structure, especially the capstone.
As you approach from the gate, you see the back end of the dolmen. In the top right-hand of the capstone, you can see a round hole which has a groove running down from it. The sun catches this beautifully at sundown. The capstone leans down at quite an angle, and it's so huge that you can't help wondering how our ancestors got it up there.

Drive carefully as the lanes are narrow and bendy. There's a little car parking space and an info board opposite the gate to the dolmen - you can't miss it.
[ Reply to This ]

Your Name: Anonymous [ Register Now ]
Subject:


Add your comment or contribution to this page. Spam or offensive posts are deleted immediately, don't even bother

<<< What is five plus one as a number? (Please type the answer to this question in the little box on the left)
You can also embed videos and other things. For Youtube please copy and paste the 'embed code'.
For Google Street View please include Street View in the text.
Create a web link like this: <a href="https://www.megalithic.co.uk">This is a link</a>  

Allowed HTML is:
<p> <b> <i> <a> <img> <em> <br> <strong> <blockquote> <tt> <li> <ol> <ul> <object> <param> <embed> <iframe>

We would like to know more about this location. Please feel free to add a brief description and any relevant information in your own language.
Wir möchten mehr über diese Stätte erfahren. Bitte zögern Sie nicht, eine kurze Beschreibung und relevante Informationen in Deutsch hinzuzufügen.
Nous aimerions en savoir encore un peu sur les lieux. S'il vous plaît n'hesitez pas à ajouter une courte description et tous les renseignements pertinents dans votre propre langue.
Quisieramos informarnos un poco más de las lugares. No dude en añadir una breve descripción y otros datos relevantes en su propio idioma.