<< Our Photo Pages >> Yellowmead - Stone Circle in England in Devon

Submitted by TheCaptain on Friday, 02 April 2021  Page Views: 34471

Neolithic and Bronze AgeSite Name: Yellowmead Alternative Name: Sheepstor 4 (Grinsell); G30 (Turner); Yellowmead Down
Country: England County: Devon Type: Stone Circle
Nearest Town: Tavistock  Nearest Village: Sheepstor
Map Ref: SX57486784  Landranger Map Number: 202
Latitude: 50.492983N  Longitude: 4.010637W
Condition:
5Perfect
4Almost Perfect
3Reasonable but with some damage
2Ruined but still recognisable as an ancient site
1Pretty much destroyed, possibly visible as crop marks
0No data.
-1Completely destroyed
4 Ambience:
5Superb
4Good
3Ordinary
2Not Good
1Awful
0No data.
4 Access:
5Can be driven to, probably with disabled access
4Short walk on a footpath
3Requiring a bit more of a walk
2A long walk
1In the middle of nowhere, a nightmare to find
0No data.
4 Accuracy:
5co-ordinates taken by GPS or official recorded co-ordinates
4co-ordinates scaled from a detailed map
3co-ordinates scaled from a bad map
2co-ordinates of the nearest village
1co-ordinates of the nearest town
0no data
5

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I have visited· I would like to visit

angieweekender whese001 michelle_b007 ForestDaughter elad13 would like to visit

wildtalents visited on 5th Jul 2023 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 5 Access: 2 I wandered fairly randomly towards the circle from a layby at the foot of Sheep Tor. Well, not so much a layby as the point where the road ceased. The farmer was kind enough not to shoot me, and to direct me properly: "I see you've been using Google maps" he commented. He seemed to be settling in some guests at a holiday cottage. On the way to the SC, about a ten minute walk from the farmer's gate, I encountered an eviscerated sheep. Or maybe sheep rot away apart from the wool and the horns? That's all that was left in any case. I saw something similar at Merrivale years ago (20+). It's a little difficult to trace the outer circles at Yellowmead: there are clearly stones missing. That's probably true of the inner circle/s as well but the stones are much tighter together and it doesn't notice so much. I spent a happy half-hour in complete isolation until I saw the clouds crowding in and decided to trudge back before the rain started again.

Catrinm visited on 16th Jan 2022 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 4 Access: 3 Second visit not so misty this time

lucasn visited on 24th Jun 2019 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 4 Access: 3

Anne T visited on 15th May 2019 - their rating: Cond: 3 Amb: 4 Access: 3 Yellowmead Fourfold Stone Circle: This stone circle has long been on my wish-list, but I thought I’d never be able to see it, because access was described as being difficult. Fortunately, Dave Parks and Sandy G had been here before and knew the pitfalls, selecting the right route for us. We were also extremely fortunate in coming here after a prolonged dry spell, so we encountered no boggy areas, apart from one by the stream on the way back to the car park. By this time of the afternoon, I was hot and tired, and my feet ached really badly, but I was determined to see this stone circle. I should have swapped my walking boots for my wellies to make the walking a little softer on the soles of my feet, but stubbornly didn’t. Mistake. However, the walk to see this circle was well worth it, although I need to apologise to the rest of the group for being very grumpy on the way back. Also, by this time the sun had come out and everyone was getting sunburned, despite the continuous application of sun-screen. It was really good to have the experts here to describe the monuments to us. Gordon and Dave Parks wandered off to see if they could find other stones in the stone row further to the WSW of the row, but the grass was knee high in this part of the meadow. Andrew, on the way back to the pub after our epic trip, was saying that he didn’t think the stone circle was entirely genuine; his thinking was the Victorians had ‘beautified’ it for tourists, so I spent some time in the car pulling up the different websites. The stone circle is described as having been ‘faithfully restored’, but Andrew still has his doubts. We all met up in the Prince of Wales in Princetown for a couple of ice cold pints, before dispersing for the evening. I confess to not recognising Sandy G in the bar, as he didn’t have his hat on – I’ve never seen him without it!

Catrinm visited on 20th Sep 2018 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 4 Access: 3 Very misty and mysterious at Yellowmead

Nexos visited on 5th May 2018 - their rating: Amb: 4 Access: 3

graemefield visited on 29th Oct 2013 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 5 Access: 3

SandyG visited on 18th Apr 2013 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 4 Access: 3

jeffrep visited on 22nd May 2011 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 4 Access: 3

BolshieBoris visited on 13th Aug 1997 - their rating: Cond: 4 Amb: 4 Access: 4 Strange concentric circles - a stone circle or the foundations for a massive hut?

Catrinm MikeGreen TheCaptain cazzyjane ArchAstro have visited here

Average ratings for this site from all visit loggers: Condition: 3.89 Ambience: 4.2 Access: 3

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by JeanFry : Yellowmead Stone Circle on Yellowmead Down, with Sheeps Tor on the skyline. An unusual Bronze Age monument consisting of four concentric circles. Many of the stones had fallen over hundreds of years and were re-erected when they were discovered. However, some stones were missing, probably used in stone walls by farmers and local inhabitants many years ago. (Vote or comment on this photo)
Four Concentric Stone Circles in Devon. This site was restored in 1921 and consists of four concentric stone circles, one of which surrounded a cairn, now badly ruined. A stone row runs to the south-west.

What an amazing site this is. On gently sloping hillside facing Sheepstor from the southeast can be found this tremendous fourfold stone circle, marked as Cairn circles on the OS map, about 20 minutes boggy walk from parking near what is known as the Scout Hut.

The site consists of four approximately concentric circles of stones, with several more stones arranged around the western circumference, which are possibly remnants of a series of rows that radiated outwards downhill from the circles. The innermost circle is about 6 metres in diameter, and made from nice slabs set closely to each other. The outer circles are made from slabs of varying size, with diameters increasing by about 5 metres a time. Some of the stones in the outer circle are very big by comparison to the majority. I found it almost impossible to get any photographs which do any justice to this site. A challenge set to you photographers out there.

A short distance uphill to the northeast from these circles is the remains of a small cairn, with a surrounding ring of stones (see nearby sites below).

Update July 2019: This site is recorded as Pastscape Monument No. 438550, and scheduled as Historic England List ID 1010212. Further information can also be found on Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks's Yellowmead Fourfold Stone Circle, and Stone Circles: Yellowmead.

The entry for Legendary Dartmoor: Yellowmead Circle gives us details of the discovery and restoration of this four-fold stone circle. "During the whole process only one was brought in from elsewhere and erected in the outer circle, (Petit, 1974, p.102)". Butler, in his "Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities", volume 3, page 74 also includes a description and plan of the stone circle. The stone circle is also featured on the Stone Rows of Great Britain website - see their entry for Yellowmead Down Stone Row, which also includes a plan of the stone circle and its row(s).

Note: 'Iconic' Sheeps Tor on Dartmoor is for sale. The land includes the Yellowmead stone circles. See full article.
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Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by wildtalents : Part of the concentric circles of stone at Yellowmead. (Vote or comment on this photo)

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Catrinm : yellowmead jan (Vote or comment on this photo)

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by JeanFry : This is not the easiest of stone circles to photograph. Ideally you would get a better shot from a stepladder if you could carry one there. I have photographed this site from different angles on different days, and hard to decide which is the best viewpoint to get all four circles in the shot. For this shot I am standing at the edge of the outer circle. I will post a couple of my other shots, wh... (Vote or comment on this photo)

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Bladup : The wonderful Yellowmead Circles (Vote or comment on this photo)

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Bladup : Yellowmead with Sunset behind Sheeps Tor

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Bladup : Yellowmead, The central circle and some ponies, Gutter Tor is in the background on the left

Yellowmead cairn
Yellowmead cairn submitted by davep : The Yellowmead Down Encircled Cairn from the Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks website (site 221), "consisting of an earth and stone mound approximately 4 meters in diameter and up to 0.3 meters high. Four stones of a retaining kerb on its west and south sides".

Yellowmead cairn
Yellowmead cairn submitted by Anne T : The Yellowmead Cairn is only a small hump in the grass, some 45-50m north east of the stone circle(s). This view looks south east towards the leat which runs SW-NE across the site, to the south west of the stone circles.

Yellowmead row
Yellowmead row submitted by Anne T : Showing the small stones of one of the rows at the bottom of the south west arc of the outer circle. Photograph shows a view across the centre of the stone circle, putting the angle of this particular row of stones into a context.

Yellowmead row
Yellowmead row submitted by Anne T : The stones of this stone row are very small and had to be pointed out to me by Sandy G and Dave P. These are the stones which emerge from the south western arc of the outer circle and run for 28.4m. The Stone Rows of Great Britain entry for this multiple row tells us there are 17 stones arranged in at least 8 separate lines which lead downslope from the circle.

Yellowmead row
Yellowmead row submitted by davep : The Yellowmead Stone Row, from the Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks website, site 166

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by davep : The Yellowmead Fourfold Cairn Circle, from Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks, site 280. Photo taken on 16-07-2016.

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Anne T : The three small stones in the centre/foreground of the photo are where the stone row emerges out of the outer ring.

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Anne T : Standing towards the south western side of the outer ring of the stone circle, looking over the western and northern part of the rings (with the central ring just above centre/right), with two distant tors on the distant horizon. We don't have any decent maps of this area, so if any one can identify which tors these are, I'd be grateful to hear. Thanks!

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Anne T : Standing just outside the gap in the inner ring (south western side), looking north east across the moorland.

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Anne T : Standing towards the eastern side of the circle, looking south/south west towards the nearby farmhouse. This is Sandy G's Intrepid Dartmoor Expedition group talking about the stone row which runs from the south western side of the outer circle.

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Starryways : Summer Solstice 2019- see my notes on suggestion as to approaches to this site.

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Catrinm : Misty and mysterious at Yellowmead Sept 2018

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Bladup : The wonderfully mysterious Yellowmead, The outcrop on the left is Sheeps tor and on the right is the aptly named Peek Hill and Sharpitor. This Original Artwork in a glass frame is £39.99 + Postage (Just whatever it costs), and is 24 cm by 16 cm. A limited (to a 100) edition print in a 8" x 10" glass frame would be £19.99 + £2.90 postage, E-mail me at [email protected] if interested. (17 comments)

Yellowmead row
Yellowmead row submitted by Bladup : Yellowmead. This row leaves the circles at the south west.

Yellowmead row
Yellowmead row submitted by Bladup : To the west of the circles is this stone, I think it's the capstone of a cist.

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Bladup : Yellowmead.

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Bladup : Yellowmead and the Sun.

Yellowmead
Yellowmead submitted by Bladup : Yellowmead inner circle. Lovely even if it was on its own, but it's not!!!

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Prehistoric Circles and Rows by Ian Honeywood


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Nearby sites listing. In the following links * = Image available
 3m NE 40° Yellowmead row* Multiple Stone Rows / Avenue (SX5748267842)
 56m ENE 64° Yellowmead cairn* Cairn (SX5753167863)
 306m ESE 108° Yellowmead ring cairn* Ring Cairn (SX57776774)
 632m SE 144° Gutter Tor Roundhouse* Ancient Village or Settlement (SX57846732)
 666m NE 48° Outholme Newtake* Cist (SX57996827)
 729m SSE 163° Gutter Tor north* Cairn (SX5767667137)
 1.0km S 171° Gutter Tor South* Cist (SX5760966828)
 1.2km E 89° Leeden (Sheepstor)* Cairn (SX5869267838)
 1.3km NE 47° Cuckoo Rock (Dartmoor)* Rock Art (SX5846668715)
 1.3km SE 126° Whittenknowles Rocks* Ancient Village or Settlement (SX5852867024)
 1.4km W 260° St Leonard's Well (Sheepstor)* Holy Well or Sacred Spring (SX5607467630)
 1.5km NE 37° Down Tor Circular Settlement* Ancient Village or Settlement (SX5840069000)
 1.5km SE 125° Drizzlecombe Brook* Marker Stone (SX5870966946)
 1.5km W 261° Roman Cross (Sheepstor)* Ancient Cross (SX5595967653)
 1.6km NNE 20° Down Tor Cist* Cist (SX58046929)
 1.7km SE 141° Eastern Tor settlement Ancient Village or Settlement (SX5852966487)
 1.8km ESE 119° Drizzlecombe stone 4* Standing Stone (Menhir) (SX58996694)
 1.8km E 100° Drizzlecombe cist 21* Cist (SX5922867476)
 1.8km ESE 109° Drizzlecombe cairn 13* Cist (SX5915167208)
 1.8km ESE 112° Drizzlecombe cairn 14* Cairn (SX5912767137)
 1.9km ESE 120° Drizzlecombe menhir 1* Standing Stone (Menhir) (SX5905766860)
 1.9km ESE 116° Drizzlecombe menhir 3* Standing Stone (Menhir) (SX5913566986)
 1.9km NE 38° Down Tor circle* Stone Circle (SX58686927)
 1.9km NE 37° Down Tor cairn* Cairn (SX58646931)
 1.9km ESE 116° Drizzlecombe row 1* Multiple Stone Rows / Avenue (SX5916166949)
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"Yellowmead" | Login/Create an Account | 20 News and Comments
  
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Re: Yellowmead by TheCaptain on Friday, 02 April 2021
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'Iconic' Sheeps Tor on Dartmoor is for sale. The land, which was last sold in 2004, is grazed by livestock, offers some climbing and includes the Yellowmead stone circles. - thought to be thousands of years old.

See full article.
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    Re: Yellowmead by Runemage on Friday, 02 April 2021
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    I wonder who will buy it. Having read the details in the BBC link about what you can't do with it, it seems there's no return on the investment and certainly no opportunity to make any profit from it unless the land price rises in time.

    Also if it's inundated with people leaving litter like so many other areas have been lately, as Landowner, would it fall to you to finance an ongoing clean-up operation?

    More sale details https://www.rightmove.co.uk/commercial-property-for-sale/property-90299020.html

    Agent's Brochure https://assets.reapit.net/sas/live/pdf.php?p=AXA190071&t=S
    [ Reply to This ]
    Re: Yellowmead and Sheeps Tor for Sale by AngieLake on Friday, 02 April 2021
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    I noticed the headlines about Sheeps Tor being for sale and didn't read the article because it was April Fool's Day. Didn't think it could be true!
    [ Reply to This ]
      Re: Yellowmead and Sheeps Tor now Sold by AngieLake on Sunday, 23 May 2021
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      The tor and the land including Yellowmead were sold on Friday. See:
      https://www.devonlive.com/news/devon-news/dartmoor-land-tor-sold-auction-5447638

      "Sheepstor and its surrounding land on Dartmoor has sold at auction for £150,000 after being put up for sale last month.

      More than 120 acres of land and the tor which is granite outcrop, was sold to the highest bidder £5,000 above its guide price.

      The land is one of Dartmoor's most prominent and famous tors which includes part of Sheepstor Common and Yellowmead Down, as well as the rare Bronze Age monument of Yellowmead stone circle which are thought to be thousands of years old."
      More on the link, including scenic photos of the area, but not the circles.
      [ Reply to This ]
    Re: Yellowmead by TheCaptain on Saturday, 03 April 2021
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    It was in the deepest depths of my Memory that Paul McCartney was possibly the previous owner, but it seems he looked but didn't buy.
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Yellowmead Stone Circle by lucasn on Sunday, 04 August 2019
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Re: Yellowmead by Starryways on Tuesday, 25 June 2019
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You need to take care as to how you approach this circle. Do not be tempted to take a beeline from the carpark at Gutter Tor. The marshy land close to the road is as close to a mire without being named one- one of our party went in and can testify there is no bottom! Gutter Mire does lie south of the track so it is all very boggy. The better route I would suggest both there and back is to gain some height by walking north east along the track, and then turn at right angles and go NW finally turning SW towards the location over gently sloping downhill contours. (Three sides of a box) -its an impressive site, well worth seeing. You will probably get your feet wet whatever you do- just avoid going in! Four circles are very clearly visible. Lovely site
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Re: Yellowmead by noisemonkey on Saturday, 21 January 2017
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Check out my 360 photos of the site on Google Maps here : https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@50.4929798,-4.0105521,3a,75y,84.21h,77.73t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s-yDo3lxqfZRQ%2FWHqetYR9_uI%2FAAAAAAAAjxE%2Fdj3SfVBABf0q723lPFLUp9vbhFbxvD4NwCLIB!2e4!7i5376!8i2688!6m1!1e1

I loved this place, it's quite compact compared to other circles I've visited which makes you wonder what the purpose was. Great ambience.
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Re: Yellowmead by Anonymous on Friday, 09 September 2016
BE CAREFUL these are near very boggy ground. You can easily lose your way and start to sink like the unfortunate chap in Hound of the Baskervilles. These are not to be confused with the other Yellowmeade, which is near Merrivale. These are near Sheepstor and Dousland, not Merrivale, where there is also a stone circle (smaller) and a farm named Yellowmeade.
[ Reply to This ]

Re: Yellowmead by Anonymous on Sunday, 03 November 2013
Greetings The Captain and everyone,
Four stone rings, the outermost fourth ring could tally 33 stones, the symbolic number and value inferring sacred, the Otherworld, the Ultimate. Can anyone plot the stones please? Remember the designers stone dust design marker ring was most probably just outside the actual stone positions, tangential, a touching circle. That way the original intention was not destroyed by the construction works digging holes to take the stones. The inner ring is quoted as six metres diameter. Convert this to ancient faethms, 2.073 metres, the circumference of an outer touching circle would be close to nine faethms. That value is the folktale number signifying humanity, three families of father mother and first child.
The increases in diameter are stated about five metres diameter each ring. I make that 21m diameter for ring 4. Hence the outermost touching stone dust circle design was 33 faethms, the head to toe height of the Long man of Wilminton, the Dodman surveyor of Stonehenge times. Neil.
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Markings on Yellowmead stones? by Andy B on Friday, 08 October 2010
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caradoc68 writes:

SX 574 678 Yellowmead. On visiting yellowmead on the south of dartmoor last weekend. As i walked round the stones i noticed a few marking, one of those markings quite clearly looks like a snake. Can any one have a look next time they are there or any info would be good?

See the photo above for more details
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    Re: Markings on Yellowmead stones? by caradoc68 on Saturday, 31 December 2011
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    Yes Andy I did, is it the stone on the outer ring that leans to one side? l have noticed this it might also have three cup and bowl markings at the top of the stone, on the same side. I've posted this picture on the portal and in the forum but no reply as yet ! Also looked in a few good books and web sites but cant find anything as relating to these markings. It might be in a book of Jeremy Butler " Dartmoor atlas of antiquities, the south west, volume III' ales l do not have this volume. R.H. Worth dose not right a lot on the the Circle apart from calling it a fourfold circle. Look forward to your reply Caradoc68.....
    [ Reply to This ]

Re: Yellowmead by TheCaptain on Monday, 09 January 2006
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The whole of Dartmoor is covered with hundreds of "letterboxes" which people hunt out and collect stamps from. Its an old custom dating back to the original one positioned at Canmore Pool, which was used to show that you have been to this extremely difficult to get to place in the middle of the moor. These days its all a bit of fun, and people put their own boxes in all sorts of places for other people to hunt down, like a sort of treasure hunt. I am sure you can easily find all sorts of details bfrom an internet search for "Dartmoor Letterbox".

However, there is a code of conduct, in that none of these boxes should be hidden or placed within the immediate vicinity of any ancient monuments, or other significant places, in order that no damage is done to them either by hiding the box there in the first place, or by people moving stones around or digging looking for them. The box you describe should certainly not be anywhere near to the centre of the Yellowmead circles. And to say it had something to do with what would appear to be a respectable organisation like Dartmoor mountain rescue team defies belief. Perhaps someone should have words with them.
[ Reply to This ]
    Re: Yellowmead by Anonymous on Tuesday, 10 January 2006
    From AngieLake:

    Dartmoor letterboxing works like this: (at least it did in the 80s!)

    When you are planning to go up on to Dartmoor letterboxing there are three or four essentials:

    A few postage-stamped, self-addressed, but otherwise blank, postcards
    A decent compass
    A good OS map of the area
    And your clues to letterboxes.
    (I think these are available in a pub in Princetown, but I got mine in the mid-80s, from the a guy I used to work with who was the owner of Pupers Hill letterbox - ['Prayer for Peace' was his stamp].)
    Maybe, also, a pen!

    Head for the wild moor and follow the clues (often a riddle, involving so many steps in a certain compass direction, from a grid ref.) As these letterboxes are so widespread, you can often stumble across them by chance; I even dowsed for one, once, on Honeybag Tor. They're usually secreted in a space under an overhanging rock, which has been blocked by a couple of stones - a dead give-away.

    There will probably be a tin box (poss old green cashbox type), or a plastic box, sometimes inside a thick polythene bag.
    Inside you'll find a visitors' book, a rubber stamp and stamp pad, and if someone has visited recently - a postcard ready for posting.

    If it's the first you've ever found, you'll probably spend ages just reading the visitors' book and marvelling at the variety of ink stamps inside, and laughing at the comments. Some people have dry and wicked senses of humour! The variety of stamps come from all the individual ones carried by walkers who've stopped here and added their comments. These are very collectable: often quite beautiful, sometimes really funny, sometimes a poignant poem like Prayer for Peace.
    (And you thought train-spotting, and - may the gods forgive me - megarak-ing, was crazy...?)

    When you've recovered, take your own postcard, stamp it with the rubber ink stamp that 'lives' in the box, and leave it there to be collected. (No - not by Postman Pat! .... by the next walker who stumbles across the box!)

    This idea isn't as daft as it sounds, as by this method you can tell how long it was, since you were there, before someone else found the letterbox!

    You then add a comment to the visitors book, after spending ages admiring the stamps of everyone else who has been before you, and trying to think up something witty. Hang on tight to the pages, as they can flutter away in the stiff wind if you're not careful!
    (Here I should add that once you are hooked you get your own unique stamp made, and carry that with you to stamp the books you find. Thus regular collectors can think what a jolly clever person you are for finding all these boxes!)
    You take any postcards that are left by previous visitors, ready to post, and post them! Make sure everything is packed away safely and water-tight again, and replace the stones so that the box is hidden.

    So - letterboxing is great fun, kids love it, and you DO get to see some lovely scenery whilst having some great exercise! If you're iffy about walking on the moor (and I guess we're not, cause we're usually stone-hunting!) it gives a purpose to the trek.

    The original box was Cranmere Pool.
    I believe there are sometimes 'travelling stamps' but not sure how this works.
    [ Reply to This ]

Re: Yellowmead by Anonymous on Monday, 09 January 2006
went here over new year, anybody know anything about the box I found in the circle?
it had something to do with the datmore mountain rescue team and it was called box 6, anyone else found it?

cheers,

Ben Powell
http://www.thecefn.com
[ Reply to This ]

Re: Yellowmead by TheCaptain on Friday, 30 July 2004
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Yellowmead Stone Circles, Dartmoor, Devon SX575678
Visited Friday, 4th June 2004

What an amazing site this is. On gently sloping hillside facing Sheepstor from the southeast can be found this tremendous fourfold stone circle, marked as Cairn circles on the OS map, about 20 minutes boggy walk from parking near what is known as the Scout Hut.

The site consists of four approximately concentric circles of stones, with several more stones arranged around the western circumference, which are possibly remnants of a series of rows that radiated outwards downhill from the circles. The innermost circle is about 6 metres in diameter, and made from nice slabs set closely to each other. The outer circles are made from slabs of varying size, with diameters increasing by about 5 metres a time. Some of the stones in the outer circle are very big by comparison to the majority. I found it almost impossible to get any photographs which do any justice to this site. A challenge set to you photographers out there.

A short distance uphill to the northeast from these circles is the remains of a small cairn, with a surrounding ring of stones.
[ Reply to This ]

Re: Yellowmead by AngieLake on Thursday, 24 June 2004
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A Devonian's response to the article regarding the proposed sale of Sheepstor:

I would have thought that a nature-loving person such as Sir Paul McCartney would not be in favour of shooting on his land, but unless he plans to live in the area, I can't quite see the point of buying it. Maybe he has another kind of shooting in mind - a video shoot in the stone circles?!

We have already been denied access to Vixen Tor, near Merrivale stone rows and their complex, because a nearby lady farmer who bought the surrounding land has fenced it off. (This was due to the mad compensation culture of our times, when everyone lives in dread of being sued for damages - in this case, should anyone fall from the rocky tor and hurt themselves, she would be liable! That's the story I heard.) This has already caused a lot of aggro, with protests from angry ramblers, and she was taken to court recently for spreading fertilizer on the land around it. The court gave her a hefty fine for doing that, because it went against the rules of the National Park Authority, altering the nature of the vegetation. For some reason, this court case will delay the re-opening of that site!

Please don't let the same thing happen to Sheepstor, as it is one of the most beautiful areas on Dartmoor. As part of the National Park, all those rugged tors should be freely accessible to the public. Maybe, if someone has to buy it, then Sir Paul would be the best conservationist? His late wife Linda certainly seemed to have a lot of respect for nature, which I believe he shared. I can certainly imagine the scenery giving him plenty of inspiration for his music.

I've just looked up Yellowmead (which I haven't visited, despite living near the SE of Dartmoor - typical - I visit all these far-flung places like Brodgar and Callanish, and what's on my own doorstep.......!! - though I have been to Drizzlecombe twice...) in the wonderful 'Circles of Stone', and to quote Aubrey Burl:

"Sheepstor has nothing to do with sheep. The name derives from the Celtic 'syth', 'steep', and the tor is indeed a 1210-feet height of stone-slithering steepness, one of the most prominent on Dartmoor. From the east its outline looks like a resting lion, and from its crest there is a marvelling panorama of moorland, wooded valleys with sycamores and hazels, trickling streams and the eroded pyramids of other tors, 'Leather', 'Down' and 'Coombeshead'."

He also says of Yellowmead:
"It lies a mile east of Sheepstor hamlet on Yellowmead down. The area is one of many antiquities, "for the Saxons were a superstitious race, and were afraid of the settlements of the people they conquered." "

In these more modern times, anyone coming down here shooting on our open moorland, or fencing off a large part of Dartmoor would have some pretty irate Devonians to reckon with!!!
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Re: Yellowmead by Vicky on Wednesday, 23 June 2004
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From This is Cornwall 23/06/2004:

IS SIR PAUL IN THE RACE FOR HISTORIC TOR?


A Beatle legend is rumoured to be among those interested in buying ancient Sheepstor and its bleak Dartmoor surroundings, Aislinn Simpson reports

One hundred thousand pounds could seem a little excessive for the ownership of a large rock, reportedly occupied by piskies, and 125 acres of desolate Dartmoor landscape.

But according to estate agents Symonds and Sampson, who are handling the sale of Sheepstor, near Tavistock, there has been a considerable amount of interest in acquiring this piece of moorland, which also boasts a prehistoric stone circle and previous owners who were related to Sir Francis Drake.

There are even suggestions that Beatles legend Sir Paul McCartney, who already owns land on Exmoor, is toying with the idea of buying Sheepstor when it is auctioned in Somerset on July 2.

John White-Hamilton, of Symonds and Sampson, said the ancient tor - hugely popular with walkers, sightseers and rock climbers - would appeal to prospective buyers precisely because of its unusual qualities, while representing a sound investment. He said: "We have already had a certain amount of interest - this is an ideal opportunity for those wanting to own a little bit of England.
"Currently it produces just over four per cent return but if used for shoots, it could return up to seven per cent, which is better than a bank, and Dartmoor is a much nicer place to visit your money."

He said the current owner, Captain Maxwell Hislop, a distant relative of the Bayly family, who have owned the land since 1839, had decided to sell in view of his advancing years.

He added that as well as 125 acres of freehold moor, the buyer would bag 350 acres of shooting rights.

But the suggested use of the moorland, which offers open access to the public and has grazing rights for local sheep farmers, for shooting has concerned local groups. The chairman of Burrator Parish Council, Keith Scrivener, said exercising such rights would sit uncomfortably with its recreational use as a National Park.
"I can't quit
"I can't quite envisage how parties of tweed-coated gunmen in deerstalkers could wander amid ramblers, rock climbers, and picnickers firing off their shotguns in all directions at low-flying grouse," he said. "For safety reasons, any new owner would have to close off this part of the moor if a shoot was to be organised and I can't believe denying access would go down well with the thousands of people from Plymouth and district who enjoy regular visits."

John Bainbridge, chairman of Dartmoor Preservation Society agreed shooting on the site would be inappropriate. He said: "It has shooting rights like every other piece of land but in practice such a use is not feasible."

He added that the preservation society itself was keen to invest in the tor, but the price was too high. Mr Bainbridge said: "If we had the money we would buy it but there is not enough time to raise it."

Local historian Paul Rendell said he hoped whatever the outcome, the tor and surrounding land would go to a good home. He said: "It would be nice to see it go to a charity or local people who will respect it, but we will have to wait and see."
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Re: Yellowmead by simcon on Monday, 22 September 2003
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Condition|Ambience|Access in my opinion is 444. 4 for access is right because it's only 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile walk from a car parking area while following a boundary wall. It's also within Access Land and not private.
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